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Kamedis August 2022

What to Eat When You Have Psoriasis: Everything You Need to Know

 Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune disease whereby skin cells are replaced at a high rate due to the imbalance of the immune system. When it comes to our skin, Psoriasis is usually displayed through purple/red patches covered with a scaly texture. Over the years, research has shown that nutrition has a large impact on the development of the disease. Therefore, is it essential we incorporate the necessary nutrition and the right skincare regimen to help manage psoriasis. 

Can Proper Nutrition Cure Psoriasis?

Unfortunately, nutrition is not the sole cure for the disease, however, if we incorporate certain foods into our diet, they can help reduce the inflammation that arises and alleviate the symptoms of the disease. Before we list the recommended foods, we suggest always consulting with your doctor before making drastic changes to your diet. 

The following list has been shown to prove anti-inflammatory abilities:
1. Nuts – walnuts and almonds
2. Fish – mackerel, tuna, sardines, and salmon
3. Fruit – blueberries, strawberries, cherries, and oranges
4. Olive oil
5. Green leaves, spinach and kale

Are there Foods that can Trigger the Disease?

Before we even get into what foods to avoid, it is important to mention how a high BMI can increase the severity of psoriasis. The relationship between healthy body weight and the decreased chance of psoriasis outbreaks. Studies (in recent years) have shown a link between consuming certain foods and the emergency of psoriasis symptoms (sources can be found below). The connection between consuming processed foods containing saturated fat & high sugar levels and obesity has displayed an increased risk of psoriasis outbreaks.

Studies (in recent years) have shown a link between consuming certain foods and the emergency of psoriasis symptoms (sources can be found below). The connection between consuming processed foods containing saturated fat & high sugar levels and obesity has displayed an increased risk of psoriasis outbreaks. 

What Foods Should be avoided?

Doctors recommend avoiding overly processed foods, sugary drinks, sweet & salty snacks, frozen food, and processed meat. Some dietitians have also recommended avoiding solanaceous vegetables such as tomatoes (part of the salty vegetable family), potatoes, garlic, and eggplant. Such foods can increase inflammation in the body and affect the severity of psoriasis. 

It is important to remember, however, that psoriasis treatment is specific to individuals similar to gluten sensitivity (we will expand on this topic later on) so it is best to consult with a professional before making any drastic changes. 

Additional studies have shown the negative effect of alcohol consumption on the immune system which can also trigger the outbreak of psoriasis. 

Can incorporating Omega-3 into our diet help ease Psoriasis?

Yes, studies have shown that consuming omega-3 can relieve various psoriasis symptoms including skin redness, itching, inflammation & scaly patches. Researchers found high percentages of these positive results in 12 out of 15 clinical trials conducted. People with psoriasis tend to develop heart diseases at higher percentages than the rest of the general population, and consuming omega-3 can help reduce the risk of heart disease and cardiac arrest.

Can Psoriasis be Transmitted through Breastmilk?

No, what causes a child to develop any form of psoriasis later in life has to do with shared genes and not breastfeeding itself. The benefits of colostrum and breast milk nutrition can actually help a baby develop a healthy immune system delaying the onset of symptoms and even preventing them. 

What about Gluten? Should it be Avoided?

The percentage of psoriasis patients with antibodies that help fight the symptoms of gluten is actually higher than the general population as is the percentage of celiac patients. British researchers have discovered a clear connection between the presence of antibodies fighting gluten effects and the severity of psoriasis.

Generally speaking, psoriasis patients do not necessarily need to avoid gluten. Only those patients who are already known to have a higher level of gluten antibodies (greater than the general population) should be more careful and even avoid gluten. Otherwise, there is probably not much benefit to avoiding gluten. It is recommended that anyone suffering from psoriasis should undergo a comprehensive gluten antibody test to have a better understanding of if to avoid it or not.

Psoriasis and the Microbiome: How are they Connected?

As mentioned, psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by an imbalance in the body’s immune system. The human microbiome is by definition the population of microorganisms found in close contact with the human body. The role of the microbiome is essential for multiple metabolic processes such as the maturation of the immune system. 

In a study conducted in 2021 (9), researchers showed that a biological treatment aimed at creating an alteration in the composition of the intestinal microbiome among psoriasis patients may help restore the intestinal balance and alleviate the symptoms of the disease.  

Should I get a Personalized Nutrition Plan?

Considering the medical approaches and recommended foods to avoid, there are certain steps that can be taken in our nutrition. Ultimately, however, treatment of psoriasis should be regarded on an individual basis. 

It is recommended to check the levels of gluten antibodies, avoid processed food, and listen to your body as it knows better than anyone what foods should be avoided and what foods make us feel food. Above all, remember to consult with your doctor or dietitian to find a personalized approach to eating and living right with psoriasis. 

How Can Kamedis Help with Psoriasis?

The Kamedis Scalp Control Ultimate Anti Dandruff Kit can help treat the symptoms of Psoriasis on the scalp. Kamedis ingredients work with the scalp’s skin to allow for short and long-term relief. They enrich the scalp’s follicles with moisture and relieve the symptoms of psoriasis including redness, itching, dryness, and scaly patches. 

The Ultimate Anti Dandruff Kit contains active ingredients including herbs with anti-inflammatory and anti-itching mechanisms, is steroid free, and gently exfoliates the scalp. The kit has been clinically tested on psoriasis patients and scientifically proven to relieve and improve the symptoms of psoriasis. 

Ultimate Anti Dandruff Kit
Ultimate Anti Dandruff Kit
Ultimate Anti Dandruff Kit
Ultimate Anti Dandruff Kit
Ultimate Anti Dandruff Kit
Ultimate Anti Dandruff Kit
Ultimate Anti Dandruff Kit
Ultimate Anti Dandruff Kit
Ultimate Anti Dandruff Kit
Ultimate Anti Dandruff Kit
Ultimate Anti Dandruff Kit
Ultimate Anti Dandruff Kit
Ultimate Anti Dandruff Kit
Ultimate Anti Dandruff Kit

Ultimate Anti Dandruff Kit

$29.00

If you are suffering from a scalp that is flaky, scaly, itchy, irritated and/or red this bundle is for you.

It includes our rich, lightly foaming Dandruff Therapy Shampoo and our overnight, leave-on cream Scalp Lotion. Together, they work to battle seborrheic dermatitis as well as purify your scalp.

Benefits: 

  • Products that work together to soothe and purify your scalp
  • A quick and effective relief from dandruff
  • Clinically proven to reduce dandruff and relieve scalp's redness by 50% in just 2 weeks
  • Formulated with carefully selected botanicals pyrithione Zinc 1.0% and glycerin

For adults and children 3 years and up.

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Bibliography:

(1) Debbaneh M, Millsop JW, Bhatia BK, Koo J, Liao W. Diet and psoriasis, part I: Impact of weight loss interventions. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2014;71(1):133-140. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2014.02.012
(2) (4) Monteiro, C., Moubarac, J., Levy, R., Canella, D., Louzada, M., & Cannon, G. (2018). Household availability of ultra-processed foods and obesity in nineteen European countries. Public Health Nutrition, 21(1), 18-26. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980017001379
(3) NPF Health Eating Guide, by Georgia Ullmann, National Psoriasis Foundation health education and program manager; Danielle L. Baham, M.S., R.D. Senior Dietitian UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center; The information presented in this resource is designed for educational purposes only and not for the purpose of rendering medical advice. Individual variances in psoriasis cases require the consultation of a physician to make sound medical decisions. The information presented here is not intended to replace the counsel of your physician. It is important to see your doctor before altering anything in your treatment plan. The National Psoriasis Foundation does not endorse any medications, products, equipment or treatments for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.
(4) Afifi, L., Danesh, M.J., Lee, K.M. et al. Dietary Behaviors in Psoriasis: Patient-Reported Outcomes from a U.S. National Survey. Dermatol Ther (Heidelb) 7, 227–242 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13555-017-0183-4
(5) (5) Adışen, E., Uzun, S., Erduran, F., & Gürer, M. A. (2018). Prevalence of smoking, alcohol consumption and metabolic syndrome in patients with psoriasis. Anais brasileiros de dermatologia, 93(2), 205–211. https://doi.org/10.1590/abd1806-4841.20186168
(6) (6) Sarkar, D., Jung, M. K., & Wang, H. J. (2015). Alcohol and the Immune System. Alcohol Research : Current Reviews, 37(2), 153–155. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4590612
(7) Woo WK, McMillan SA, Watson RG, McCluggage WG, Sloan JM, McMillan JC. Coeliac disease-associated antibodies correlate with psoriasis activity. Br J Dermatol. 2004 Oct;151(4):891-4.
(8) Sarkar, D., Jung, M. K., & Wang, H. J. (2015). Alcohol and the Immune System. Alcohol Research : Current Reviews, 37(2), 153–155. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4590612
(9) https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33511673/

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